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Got on the Train to Waterloo, and was surprised to see it many obviously heading for the March. Began to get a good feeling and be excited – surely we could influence Gvt?. At Waterloo Station I couldn’t believe the numbers! There were so many of us. We were kind of smiling with each other. Everyone was really well behaved – there were no police that I could see. We all headed for the bridge over the Thames to reach the north side where the March would start from, what was normally a 10 walk took atleast 45 minutes due to sheer number of people. It was also a very warm day I was glad of that. As I got to middle of the Bridge the people already on Embankment were moving – the March had begun. I stood and just gazed in wonder at the endless mass and waved – they waved back! It largely self policed – I barely saw a police officer that whole day. Still more amazed by the time we had slowly made our way to a further point, when another huge mass of people filed in from another start point we were like two rivers merging in to one huge Amazon-like river. The eclectic make up of the march was also something to behold – people from all walks of life, ages, colour and class. It was a a joy to be part of. I knew that the only political parties that declared they would vote against the war were the Liberal Democrats who I think announced it that very day, but I felt that many more MPs would do so – even if the 2 main Leadership and Cabinets did not. I was both angry and deeply sad that PM Blair, who I had voted for, dismissed us as being something like naive, he knew what was best! I think he made a statement later that day. Wonderful Speakers at the Rally – and then that awful vote for war, and many in the Labour Party who I really thought would declare themselves to be with us – voted for war, even though it was a massive 139 Labour MP rebellion = a few Tories and all the Lib Dems and 11 “others”. I never expected anything better from the Conservative Party, but was appalled by Labour leadership – with honourable exception of Robin Cook. Devastated by the vote. Even more so by its aftermath. But the March will always be a memorable occasion – and I have bought a photographic book of that day in the UK and around the world.