Menu

Background

Background

15 February, 2003

On February 15, 2003, millions of ordinary citizens in over 800 cities around the world poured into the streets to protest against the rush towards the invasion of Iraq.

According to BBC News, 6 to 10 million people took part in protests in up to 60 countries, on every continent, over the weekend of the 15th and 16th of February 2003. Other reports estimated the actual number was closer to 30 million. Protesters from Tasmania to Iceland, New York to Sydney, and London to Rome, marched against the impending war in Iraq. Even at the McMurdo base in Antarctica, 
more than 50 scientists staged a half-hour rally.

It has been described as “the biggest and most widespread collective protest the world has ever seen.” This film will unveil the drama, emotion, magnitude and testimonies of a historic day.

What they said

“There may still be two superpowers on the planet: the United States and world public opinion.”

— The New York Times

“Half a mile away, round the corner in Piccadilly, the ground shook. An ocean, a perfect storm of people. Banners, a bobbing cherry-blossom of banners, covered every inch back to the Circus – and for miles beyond, south to the river, north to Euston. …

There were nuns. Toddlers. Women barristers. The Eton George Orwell Society. Archaeologists Against War. There were country folk and lecturers, dentists and poulterers, a hairdresser from Cardiff and a poet from Cheltenham. …

It was the biggest public demonstration ever held in Britain, surpassing every one of the organisers’ wildest expectations and Tony Blair’s worst fears, and it will be remembered for the bleak bitterness of the day and the colourful warmth of feeling in the extraordinary crowds.”

— The Observer